CHRISTIAN LITERATURE TODAY

Was blind, but now I see.

1 : 7  May 2002

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  • E-mail your articles and book-length reports to thirumalai@bethfel.org or send it by regular mail to:
    M. S. Thirumalai, Ph.D.
    6820 Auto Club Road #320
    Bloomington, MN 55438 USA
  • Your articles and booklength reports should be written, preferably, following the MLA Stylesheet.
  • The Editorial Board has the right to accept, reject, or suggest modifications to the articles submitted for publication, and to make suitable stylistic adjustments. High quality, academic integrity, ethics, and morals are expected from the authors and discussants.

Copyright © 2001
M. S. Thirumalai

CONTENTS


Christian Literature Today is a monthly online journal devoted to the worship of the Lord Jesus Christ through literature. We wish to introduce our readers to the best Christian literature in popular language. Christian Literature Today is a cross-cultural journal, focusing on Christian literature written in all the languages of the world. We learn by listening to and reading our brothers and sisters in Christ from all around the world. We believe that any creative writing with literary sensibilities that focuses on the presence and life-changing ministry of Jesus Christ is Christian literature.
  • THE OPENNESS OF GOD AND CREATIVE WRITING by Tom Shetler.
    Is God accessible to us? Or is He aloof from us, sitting in His throne in the heavens, and simply judging us for what we do or not do, without guiding us when we seek Him? Does He suffer with us even as He lifts us from mire? What would be Christian literature like if God were to be always aloof, stern, and judgmental, never stooping "low" to help us? The Bible does not describe a disengaged, passionless God.
  • ABANDON AND OTHER POEMS by Teri Kojetin.
    An indigenous child from Mexico who has, with her family, been taken to the west coast of Mexico to work in the vegetable fields as migrant workers for 5 to 6 months....
    Past this abundance
    we enter another world,
    Metal buildings set on hard cement,
    row after row of small, square rooms
    filled with nothing,
    Empty, like my heart.
    Who will fill me?
  • THE SPIRIT OF JANETTE OKE'S NOVELS by M. S. Thirumalai.
    Significantly lacking in violence, a trait often, and unnecessarily, associated with the Western genre, Oke's novels would speak of the ordinary multitudes in their extraordinary simplicity of faith, love and work. But, then, while the folks are simple, their stories are not. Time becomes the canvas, but the growth is what is drawn on it. ... Validity and relevance of moral truth presented in a work alone is not a sufficient motivating ground for one to go back to a work of fiction. Moral truth can be obtained in abundance in non-fiction.
  • MONTE CRISTO AND SALVATION FROM END TO BEGINNING by Kent Garborg.
    I enjoy a movie more if I can see how it ends before viewing the entire movie. These new multi-screen theaters are so great because while you are waiting for your movie to begin you can pop into another theater and see the end of a movie you would like to see in the future. ... That's what I like about the Bible story too.
  • WHO'S IN CONTROL, YOU OR CHRIST? by Pastor Harold Brokke.
    We are bombarded with the advice that we take charge and be in control of our life. Modern literary works including television shows and movies often focus on this theme and encourage their audiences to be in control of the situation they are in. Are we really in control of our life always? To what extent this theme of self-dependence (rather self-glorification) should be encouraged in Christian creative writing? Is this notion or outcry really in tune with the Word of God?
  • LUTHER'S PROTEST a book by M. S. Thirumalai.
    From a secluded life in the Augustinian cloister, Luther saw the Light and proclaimed the supremacy of the Word over every thing and every one. He moved from a belief that the Pope in Rome was endowed with powers to pardon sins to an assertion that salvation and remission of sins was free for all, given us by Godís grace and received by us in faith. He moved from a wholly Roman consciousness to an assertion of the German identity of the Church. In many more ways Lutherís life was one of dynamic mobility to usher in changes, and to be in harmony with the moves of the times encouraged by the Holy Spirit.

CONTACT EDITOR

At the Crossroads. Let us take the Gospel to the whole world, with love, hope, and faith. Courtesy: DINAMALAR